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Old 04-30-2013, 06:15 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Power of attorney over state lines?

Hi, I have a quick question. My fiancee had power of attorney over his grandmother when she and he both lived in New Mexico, and when he and his grandmother moved to Alabama, he tried to sign it over to his mother. When his mother went to get it approved through the court system they said they wanted to speak to his grandmother about it. At the time, she was exceedingly ill with frontal lobe dementia with Lewy Body's and duodinal cancer (sp?) and thus was unable to get to court. The judge never denied the motion to change power of attorney but it never went through either because they couldn't physically get his grandmother in to see a judge. Does that mean that he still has power of attorney? And if she's deceased, does that mean he's the person who decides her estate? If you could give me some insight or some means to research this, that would be awesome. Thanks!
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Old 05-01-2013, 06:06 PM   #2 (permalink)
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So long as the Power of Attorney document is valid, the agreement is good in any state.

Read more: Is a Power of Attorney Good in Any State? | eHow.com Is a Power of Attorney Good in Any State? | eHow.com
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Old 12-16-2014, 10:01 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Power of Attorney After Death

The power of attorney only applies when the assignor is still alive, but incapable of being able to perform and function due to a disability and incapacity. Powers of attorney do not survive death. After death, the executor of the estate handles all financial and legal matters, according to the provisions of the will. An individual can designate power of attorney to his attorney, family member or friend and also name that same person as executor of the estate.

When the principal (your grandmother) passed away, the power of attorney expires and the will document then control and who ever was assigned to be the executor of estate now has power to distribute the deceased property, handle legal and financial matters, and act as the "agent" of the estate.

So basically, now you have to decide what is in the will because that is the only document that controls after death
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